Astronomy4all
Supernova Remnant 3C58  (NASA, Chandra, 07/22/14) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
In commemoration of the 15th anniversary of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, four newly processed images of supernova remnants dramatically illustrate Chandra’s unique ability to explore high-energy processes in the cosmos.
This image shows 3C58, the remnant of a supernova observed in the year 1181 AD by Chinese and Japanese astronomers. This new Chandra image shows the center of 3C58, which contains a rapidly spinning neutron star surrounded by a thick ring, or torus, of X-ray emission. The pulsar also has produced jets of X-rays blasting away from it to both the left and right, and extending trillions of miles. These jets are responsible for creating the elaborate web of loops and swirls revealed in the X-ray data. These features, similar to those found in the Crab Nebula, are evidence that 3C58 and others like it are capable of generating both swarms of high-energy particles and powerful magnetic fields. In this image, low, medium, and high-energy X-rays detected by Chandra are red, green, and blue respectively.
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra’s science and flight operations.
Read full article:www.nasa.gov/chandra/news/chandra-15th-anniversary.html
Original caption/more images: www.nasa.gov/chandra/multimedia/chandra-15th-anniversary-…
Image credit: NASA/CXC/SAO

Supernova Remnant 3C58 (NASA, Chandra, 07/22/14) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
In commemoration of the 15th anniversary of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, four newly processed images of supernova remnants dramatically illustrate Chandra’s unique ability to explore high-energy processes in the cosmos.

This image shows 3C58, the remnant of a supernova observed in the year 1181 AD by Chinese and Japanese astronomers. This new Chandra image shows the center of 3C58, which contains a rapidly spinning neutron star surrounded by a thick ring, or torus, of X-ray emission. The pulsar also has produced jets of X-rays blasting away from it to both the left and right, and extending trillions of miles. These jets are responsible for creating the elaborate web of loops and swirls revealed in the X-ray data. These features, similar to those found in the Crab Nebula, are evidence that 3C58 and others like it are capable of generating both swarms of high-energy particles and powerful magnetic fields. In this image, low, medium, and high-energy X-rays detected by Chandra are red, green, and blue respectively.

NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra’s science and flight operations.

Read full article:
www.nasa.gov/chandra/news/chandra-15th-anniversary.html

Original caption/more images: www.nasa.gov/chandra/multimedia/chandra-15th-anniversary-…

Image credit: NASA/CXC/SAO

Milky Way over Mono Lake by Jeffrey Sullivan on Flickr.
Evening fog by B_Olsen on Flickr.

Evening fog by B_Olsen on Flickr.

Cygnus loop - Veil nebula - 7nm Ha by Mick Hyde on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
135mm Pentax lens
21 x 300s 1x1 binned
Michael L Hyde (c) 2014

Cygnus loop - Veil nebula - 7nm Ha by Mick Hyde on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
135mm Pentax lens
21 x 300s 1x1 binned
Michael L Hyde (c) 2014

Milky Way by Tanya Harrison on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
The Milky Way as viewed from the Grandview Campground in Ancient Brisltecone Pine Forest, California.
Camera: Fuji X-T1
Lens: Fuji 56mm f/1.2
Aperture: f/1.2
Shutter Speed: 10 seconds
ISO: 800

Milky Way by Tanya Harrison on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
The Milky Way as viewed from the Grandview Campground in Ancient Brisltecone Pine Forest, California.

Camera: Fuji X-T1
Lens: Fuji 56mm f/1.2
Aperture: f/1.2
Shutter Speed: 10 seconds
ISO: 800

The Wild Duck Cluster M11 by Terry Hancock www.downunderobservatory.com on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Also known as Messier 11, or NGC 6705 it is an open cluster in the constellation Scutum. One of the richest and most compact of the known open clusters, containing about 2900 stars. Its age has been estimated to about 220 million years and approximately 6000 light years distant.

The Wild Duck Cluster M11 by Terry Hancock www.downunderobservatory.com on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Also known as Messier 11, or NGC 6705 it is an open cluster in the constellation Scutum. One of the richest and most compact of the known open clusters, containing about 2900 stars. Its age has been estimated to about 220 million years and approximately 6000 light years distant.

UGC 6138 by geckzilla on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Moving right along: Galaxy number four of six from Proposal 10550! Lovely spiral structures to this one and also a nice contrast with a background edge-on galaxy seen straight through the galactic nucleus. Look at how bright the background galaxy is compared to it. I am only just beginning to learn how dark matter possibly takes up residence in the centers of these low-surface-brightness galaxies as opposed to mainly the halo of normal galaxies. I’m also still trying to understand if these can be called dwarf galaxies. Sometimes you can’t just look at something and drop it easily into a category or two.
Speaking of background galaxies, my favorite part about this image are these faint fuzzies. On the left side of the field is a three-armed galaxy (cropped, close-up here) the likes of which I have never seen before. I’ve seen other pictures of them but they’re usually jumbled and barely discernible as having three arms. For this one, there is no question. It’s almost perfect and it even looks triangular.
In the upper right corner is a galaxy which looks exactly like a baby crocodile head.
The chip gap is here to torment me again. I’ve filled it with somewhat blurry, noisy fake data to keep the distraction minimal. As always, it is not blended with real data. The line between the fake data in the gap and the real data is a hard one.
Red: HST_10550_04_ACS_WFC_F775W_sci
Green: Pseudo
Blue: HST_10550_04_ACS_WFC_F475W_sci
North is NOT up. It is 29.5° clockwise from up.

UGC 6138 by geckzilla on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Moving right along: Galaxy number four of six from Proposal 10550! Lovely spiral structures to this one and also a nice contrast with a background edge-on galaxy seen straight through the galactic nucleus. Look at how bright the background galaxy is compared to it. I am only just beginning to learn how dark matter possibly takes up residence in the centers of these low-surface-brightness galaxies as opposed to mainly the halo of normal galaxies. I’m also still trying to understand if these can be called dwarf galaxies. Sometimes you can’t just look at something and drop it easily into a category or two.

Speaking of background galaxies, my favorite part about this image are these faint fuzzies. On the left side of the field is a three-armed galaxy (cropped, close-up here) the likes of which I have never seen before. I’ve seen other pictures of them but they’re usually jumbled and barely discernible as having three arms. For this one, there is no question. It’s almost perfect and it even looks triangular.

In the upper right corner is a galaxy which looks exactly like a baby crocodile head.

The chip gap is here to torment me again. I’ve filled it with somewhat blurry, noisy fake data to keep the distraction minimal. As always, it is not blended with real data. The line between the fake data in the gap and the real data is a hard one.

Red: HST_10550_04_ACS_WFC_F775W_sci
Green: Pseudo
Blue: HST_10550_04_ACS_WFC_F475W_sci

North is NOT up. It is 29.5° clockwise from up.

Sparks lake bullseye by Sergio Garcia Rill on Flickr.