Astronomy4all
Layers in Gale Crater by Lunar and Planetary Institute on Flickr.Via Flickr:
This HiRISE image covers a portion of the layered deposits in Gale crater, but is located to the southeast of the main stack of the deposits and is perhaps revealing a lower part of the section. The deposits are remarkably uniform at submeter scales and are not comprised of loose sediment, as evidenced by numerous fractures and scarps that run through and along some layers. Though there are a few impact craters preserved, wind erosion has stripped and etched the surface of the layers, producing few large blocks and little in the way of talus or other debris. The deposit’s uniform character—and the manner of erosion—suggests it is comprised of fine-grained sediments, perhaps an accumulation of dust or volcanic ash blown in by the wind. Observation Geometry: Image PSP_001897_1745 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 22-Dec-2006. The complete image is centered at -5.3 degrees latitude, 138.3 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 267.3 km (167.1 miles). At this distance the image scale is 26.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~80 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 03:38 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 57 degrees, thus the sun was about 33 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 154.3 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Summer.

Layers in Gale Crater by Lunar and Planetary Institute on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
This HiRISE image covers a portion of the layered deposits in Gale crater, but is located to the southeast of the main stack of the deposits and is perhaps revealing a lower part of the section. The deposits are remarkably uniform at submeter scales and are not comprised of loose sediment, as evidenced by numerous fractures and scarps that run through and along some layers. Though there are a few impact craters preserved, wind erosion has stripped and etched the surface of the layers, producing few large blocks and little in the way of talus or other debris. The deposit’s uniform character—and the manner of erosion—suggests it is comprised of fine-grained sediments, perhaps an accumulation of dust or volcanic ash blown in by the wind. Observation Geometry: Image PSP_001897_1745 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 22-Dec-2006. The complete image is centered at -5.3 degrees latitude, 138.3 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 267.3 km (167.1 miles). At this distance the image scale is 26.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~80 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 03:38 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 57 degrees, thus the sun was about 33 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 154.3 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Summer.

  1. starstuffblog reblogged this from spacettf
  2. spacettf posted this