Astronomy4all
Aurora Australis Over Indian Ocean (NASA, International Space Station, 04/26/14) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:   
A wish-bone shaped display of Aurora Australis over the Indian Ocean serves as a very colorful backdrop for the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft which is docked to the International Space Station, 226 miles above Earth. Earth’s horizon divides the scene horizontally between the blackness of space and the dark portion of the planet. The photograph was taken by one of the Expedition 39 crew members aboard the orbital outpost.About Crew Earth Observations:
In Crew Earth Observations (CEO), crewmembers on the International Space Station (ISS) photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions. A major emphasis of CEO is to monitor disaster response events in support of the International Disaster Charter (IDC).  CEO imagery provides researchers on Earth with key data to understand the planet from the perspective of the ISS.  Crewmembers have been photographing Earth from space since the early Mercury missions beginning in 1961. The continuous images taken from the ISS ensure this record remains unbroken.
Image credit: NASA

Aurora Australis Over Indian Ocean (NASA, International Space Station, 04/26/14) by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:

A wish-bone shaped display of Aurora Australis over the Indian Ocean serves as a very colorful backdrop for the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft which is docked to the International Space Station, 226 miles above Earth. Earth’s horizon divides the scene horizontally between the blackness of space and the dark portion of the planet. The photograph was taken by one of the Expedition 39 crew members aboard the orbital outpost.

About Crew Earth Observations:

In Crew Earth Observations (CEO), crewmembers on the International Space Station (ISS) photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions. A major emphasis of CEO is to monitor disaster response events in support of the International Disaster Charter (IDC). CEO imagery provides researchers on Earth with key data to understand the planet from the perspective of the ISS. Crewmembers have been photographing Earth from space since the early Mercury missions beginning in 1961. The continuous images taken from the ISS ensure this record remains unbroken.

Image credit: NASA

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